Change in the Social Studies Curriculum of Selected Schools in India from 1947 to 1961

Author: 
Dave, Jagdish P.
Year: 
1964

     The purpose of this study is to inquire into the nature and extent of change in the social studies programs of high schools in India after independence and to determine some of the conditions associated with maximum change in the social studies curriculum. . . . The following inquiries are made regarding the extent and nature of change: (1) What changes are noticeable in the objectives of the teaching of the social studies? (2) What changes are noticeable in the organization of learning experiences in the field of social studies? (3) What changes are noticeable in the methods of social studies instruction? . . . . In order to guide the investigation regarding the conditions of change, answers to the following questions are sought: (1) To what extent did the freedom to develop the curriculum locally facilitate change in the social studies curriculum? (2) To what extent was material and technical aid conducive to change in the social studies curriculum? (3) To what extent was the availability of facilities for the professional growth of teachers conducive to change in the social studies curriculum? (4) To what extent was the change in the social studies curriculum related to the leadership demonstrated by school administrators? (5) To what extent did the external public examination restrict change in the social studies curriculum? (6) To what extent did the degree of satisfaction with the existing social studies program influence efforts to change that program?
     As regards sampling of regions, Gujarat State and Greater Bombay were selected for the study under investigation. . . . As regards sampling of schools, the study included whatever schools -- private, government or 'public' -- were available for the study. The study also included the new types of schools known as 'project schools' -- schools which have undertaken some kind of experimentation in their curriculum.

Advisor(s): 
Kenneth J. Rehage (chair), Maurice L. Hartung, Benjamin S. Bloom, Mark M. Krug
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