India

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Different Habits, Different Hearts: Orthodoxy and Progressivism in the United States and India

Author: 
Jensen, Lene Arnett
Year: 
1996

     Based upon his analysis of public discourse on issues such as abortion, family policy, and the content of education, J.D. Hunter (1991, 1994) argues that the United States is experiencing a 'culture war.' On the one side are 'orthodox' groups who hold that individuals ought to adhere to moral precepts revealed by a transcendent authority. On the other side are 'progressivist' groups who emphasize that morality is understood and formulated in human terms, and who favor individual self-determination and self-expression.

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Legal Representations of Khojas and Pushtimarga Vaishnava Polities as Communities: The Aga Khan Case and the Maharaj Libel Case in Mid-Nineteenth Century Bombay

Author: 
Shodhan, Amrita
Year: 
1995

     I examine how the judicial courts dealt with the 'polities' of Khojas and Pushtimargis as 'communities' within Islam and Hinduism respectively. I want to draw attention to two things in the above formulation: one, that the Khojas and Pushtimargis who one may characterise as 'polities' were treated as 'communities'; and two, that they were examined by reference to a court determined 'true' Islam and Hinduism.

Encounters Over Tea: Labor, Gender, and Politics on an Indian Plantation

Author: 
Chatterjee, Piya
Year: 
1995

     Encounters Over Tea is a historical and ethnographic study of the political cultures of a tea plantation in North Bengal. Its basic theoretical questions are concerned with the ways in which the neo-colonial Indian plantation remains an enduring cultural system of domination deeply rooted in its living colonial past. As such, it details the political cultures of patronage through which women and men workers consent and contest the plantation's many hegemonic compulsions.

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Riots and Victims: Violence and the Construction of Communal Identity among Bengali Muslims, 1905-1947

Author: 
Gossman, Patricia
Year: 
1995

     Communalism, as examined in this dissertation, is not a 'given' political identity but a tool, a deliberate strategy employed to secure political advantages.

Receiving and Giving: Distributivity as the Source of Women

Author: 
Menon, Usha
Year: 
1995

     This dissertation explores the various criteria that Hindu women living in the temple town of Bhubaneswar in Orissa, eastern India, consider essential for achieving wellbeing. It uses native exegeses and indigenous concepts to understand and appreciate these criteria. It suggests that for these women who live in extended households in a fairly orthodox Hindu community, wellbeing results from occupying particular family roles, those that are characterized by a vigorous distributivity.

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Making and Remaking the Village: The Pragmatics of Social Life in Rural Tamilnadu

Author: 
Mines, Diane Paul
Year: 
1995

     The dissertation argues that residents of Yanaimangalam, a predominantly Hindu village in Tamil south India, define themselves and their social community -- their 'village' -- heterogeneously, and that temple association formation is one of the central means by which they do so.

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Images of Kabir: A Study of Transformations in Identity of a Sant

Author: 
Swain, David Carl
Year: 
1994

     I began my study of Kabir with a fundamental question: 'Who was Kabir?' During my field research, I posed this question to school teachers and principals, students, Kabir Panthi mahants and their disciples, scholars, designers of school syllabi, and programming directors at the national television and radio headquarters. One of the most striking features of the responses consisted in their variety. I was told that Kabir was, 'a great Hindi poet,' 'a Sant,' 'a social reformer,' 'an iconoclast,' 'an atheist,' 'Bhagwan,' etc.

Rasa and Romance: The Madhumalati of Shaikh Manjhan Shattari

Author: 
Behl, Aditya
Year: 
1995

     A problem in viewing pre-modern Indian cultural history is religious syncretism, a term used by colonialist and nationalist critics to explain texts and practices which combine elements of Hindu and Muslim religious cultures in forming a Sufi community. One of the major genres of Hindi poetry is the Avadhi Sufi premakhyan or love-story. The genre includes the Padmavat of Malik Muhammad Jayasi and the Madhumalati of Shaikh Manjhan Shattari.

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Toward a Grammar of Love: A Comparative Study of Interpretive Modes in Classical Indian Poetry

Author: 
Selby, Martha Ann
Year: 
1994

     This dissertation examines modes of interpretation in classical Indian love poetry. The word 'classical' in the Indian context necessarily covers a time frame that extends beyond ten centuries, across three languages, and also encompasses various modes of text production, assuming that these poems existed for some time before they were chosen for inclusion in the bodies of literature that we now know.

Conquest of Marketplace: Exchange, Authority, and Conflict in Early Colonial North India

Author: 
Sen, Sudipta
Year: 
1994

     This dissertation is an inquiry into the struggle for the dominance over marketplaces in the Bengal Presidency during the establishment of East India Company's rule. It analyzes contemporary British notions of markets that came into conflict with local practices in the marketplaces of Bengal and Banaras and various forms of authority which they embodied.

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